Non-US Contractors Taxed To Pay For 9/11 Medical Benefits

January 3, 2011

The James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 was signed by President Obama on January 2, 2011. The Act established the World Trade Center Health Program and, among other things, provides for medical monitoring and treatment benefits to eligible emergency responders and recovery and cleanup workers who responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

To pay for the costs of this program, the Act imposes what amounts to a two percent gross revenue tax on “foreign persons” for amounts received as US government contractors for work performed in certain countries. The US Government contracts covered are those for services performed in, or goods produced or manufactured in, any country which is not a party to an international procurement agreement with the United States.

There are several bilateral trade agreements covering government procurement, but the primary multilateral agreement covering government procurement is the World Trade Organization Agreement on Government Procurement. Although the specific countries covered by this definition will most likely be specified in regulations that will certainly be issued to implement this Act, the countries most likely covered are Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, central Asia and the Middle East (excluding Israel but including the Persian Gulf countries), and Turkey.

The Act defines “foreign person” as any person other than a United States person. The tax will apply to contracts awarded on or after January 2, 2011.

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